Are you a quilter looking to add beautiful appliqué and intricate quilt details to your projects?

If so, having the right needle size is essential for success. Machine quilting requires specific needles that can penetrate dense fabrics without fraying them or causing damage.

In this blog post, we’ll explore what size of needle you should look for when it comes to machine quilting and provide some tips on how to ensure that you get the best results from your project every time!

The Basics of Needle Sizes for Machine Quilting

When it comes to machine quilting, needles are typically sized in metric and American systems.

In the metric system, needle sizes range from 60/8 to 110/18. The lower the number, the smaller the needle size; a 60/8 is a very small needle while a 110/18 is relatively large.

In the American system, needle sizes range from 9 to 18. Again, the lower the number, the smaller the needle size; a size 9 is a very small needle while a size 18 is relatively large.

When it comes to quilting needles for your machine, there are two main types: universal and micro-tex.

Universal needles are designed for general use and can be used for quilting many fabric types, including cotton, linen, and silk.

Micro-tex needles are most commonly used for piecing and detailing as they have sharper points which help to minimize friction when stitching through multiple layers of fabric.

Different Needle Sizes for Machine Quilting

Here are some of the most common needle sizes and what types of fabrics they are best suited for:

60/8:

This is the smallest needle size and it is best suited for sewing lightweight fabrics such as silk, muslin, organza, and chiffon.

70/10:

This needle size is best used for piecing quilts and stitching fine details in light to medium-weight fabrics such as cotton and linen.

80/12:

This is a versatile needle size that can be used for most quilting projects. It can be used to stitch through multiple layers of fabric and is also suitable for sewing heavier fabrics like denim and canvas.

90/14:

This needle size is ideal for piecing thick fabrics such as wool, corduroy, and canvas. It is also great for embroidery projects that require multiple layers of fabric.

100/16:

This needle size is suitable for thick fabrics like upholstery fabric, leather, and vinyl. It has a larger eye which allows for thicker threads to be used when quilting.

110/18:

This is the largest needle size and it is great for heavy-duty quilting projects such as sewing multiple layers of thick fabric or leather.

Tips for Choosing the Right-Sized Needle for Your Project

Here are some tips to help you choose the right size needle for your machine quilting project:

  • Start with the lowest needle size and work your way up until you find the right size for your fabric. This will help to ensure that the needle doesn't cause any damage to the fabric while quilting.
  • Test out different sizes on a scrap piece of fabric before you start quilting your project. This will give you an idea of how the needle will perform and which size is best suited for your fabric.
  • For quilting projects that involve multiple layers, it's best to use a larger needle as this will help to reduce friction when stitching through the thicker fabrics.
  • If you are using thick threads, then it's important to choose a larger needle size as this will help to ensure that the thread can pass through the eye of the needle without any problems.

How to Properly Thread and Insert a Needle in Your Machine

Once you have selected the right size needle for your project, it's important to thread and insert it properly to ensure that you get the best results.

Here are some tips for proper needle insertion:

  • Always use a brand-new needle when starting a new quilting project. Old needles can cause snags and poor stitching quality.
  • Make sure to thread the needle correctly and ensure that it is tight. If the needle is not properly threaded, then it won't be able to penetrate the fabric correctly.
  • Insert the needle into your machine with the flat side facing down, as this will help to reduce friction when quilting multiple layers of fabric.
  • Once the needle is in place, use a small screwdriver to tighten it. This will help ensure it doesn't move around while you are quilting.

Following these steps will help to ensure that your machine quilting project turns out just as you envisioned!

With the right size of needle and proper insertion techniques, you can achieve beautiful results every time.

Feature on Different Brands Available in the Market

Here are some of the most common brands that you can find in the market for machine quilting needles:

Organ:

Organ needles are known for their strength and durability.

They are made from high-quality steel which helps to ensure that the needle doesn't bend or break while stitching through multiple layers of fabric.

Schmetz:

Schmetz needles are popular amongst quilters due to their exceptional quality.

They have a special coating that helps to reduce needle breakage and ensures that the needle runs smoothly through the fabric.

Clover:

Clover needles are known for their sharp points which make it easier to stitch intricate details. They also feature a special coating that helps to reduce friction while quilting, making them ideal for delicate fabrics like silk and organza.

Gütermann:

Gütermann needles are made from high-quality stainless steel which helps to ensure that the needle doesn't rust or corrode.

They also feature an advanced coating which reduces friction and improves stitch quality.

Choosing the right brand of quilting needle is important as it can affect the quality of your stitching.

Carefully read reviews and compare different brands before making a decision.

What Type of Fabric Should You Use with Each Needle Size

The type of fabric you should use with each needle size will depend on what kind of project you are working on.

For lighter fabrics such as silk and chiffon, it's best to use a 60/8 or 70/10 needle. For medium-weight fabrics like cotton and linen, an 80/12 needle is ideal.

If your project involves multiple layers of thick fabrics such as wool and canvas, then it's best to use a 90/14 or 100/16 needle.

The larger 110/18 needle should be reserved for heavy-duty projects such as leather and upholstery fabric.

It's important to test out different sizes on a scrap piece of fabric before stitching your project to ensure that you get the best results.

This will also help to determine which needle size is ideal for the fabric weight and thickness.

What If You Don’t Have the Right Size Needle

If you don't have the right size needle for your project, there are still a few things that you can do to ensure success.

For example, if you only have a 90/14 needle but need to use an 80/12, try using a smaller thread with the 90/14 needle as this will reduce the amount of strain on the fabric.

You can also try using a stabilizer on the back of your project to help reduce fabric movement and provide more support.

This will help to ensure that your stitches remain even and consistent throughout the entirety of the quilt.

It’s also important to remember that different machines have different needle sizes, so make sure you check the size before inserting it into your machine.

With the right needle size and a few simple techniques, you can achieve beautiful quilting results every time!

Troubleshooting Common Problems with Machine Quilting Needles

Here are some tips to keep in mind if you are having trouble with your machine quilting needles:

  • Make sure that the needle is properly threaded and that it is not bent or damaged.
  • Check the tension of the bobbin thread. If it's too loose, then it can cause snags when stitching through multiple layers of fabric.
  • Make sure that you are using the correct size needle for your fabric weight and thickness. A too-small needle can cause skipped stitches, while a too-large needle can cause damage to the fabric.
  • Clean out the bobbin area regularly to ensure that there is no lint buildup which could affect the quality of your stitching.
  • Keep the needle in good shape by replacing it every few projects. Old needles can cause skipped stitches or breakage.

Following these tips will help to ensure that you get the best results from your machine quilting projects every time!

Choosing the Right Needle for Your Project

The type of quilting needle you choose for your project will depend on the fabric weight and thickness.

For lightweight fabrics, like muslin and silk, it's best to use a 60/8 or 70/10 needle. If your project involves multiple layers of medium-weight fabrics such as cotton and linen, then an 80/12 needle is ideal.

For heavier fabrics such as wool and canvas, a 90/14 or 100/16 needle can provide the best results. The 110/18 is usually reserved for very heavy-duty projects such as leather and upholstery items.

It's also important to keep in mind that different machine brands may require different sizes of needles so make sure you always check before purchasing.

Additionally, it's a good idea to test out different sizes on a scrap piece of fabric before stitching your project to ensure that you get the best results.

With the right needle size and proper techniques, you can achieve beautiful quilting results every time!

FAQs:

What is the best brand for machine quilting needles?

Organ, Schmetz, and Clover are all popular brands amongst quilters due to their exceptional quality.

All of these brands offer a variety of needle sizes and are designed to work with different types of fabrics.

It's important to read reviews and compare different brands before deciding on the type of needle you choose can affect the quality of your stitching.

Do machine quilting needles need to be changed often?

Yes, it's a good idea to change your machine quilting needles every few projects. Over time, old needles can become bent or dull which can cause skipped stitches and breakage.

Additionally, using a new needle will help to ensure that the fabric isn't damaged while quilting and that your stitches remain even and consistent throughout the entire project.

What size of stabilizer should I use for machine quilting?

The size of the stabilizer you should use for machine quilting will depend on the fabric weight and thickness.

Generally, a lightweight stabilizer such as tear-away is best used with lighter fabrics like muslin and silk, for thicker medium-weight fabrics such as cotton and linen, a regular or heavy-weight cut-away stabilizer is recommended.

What should I do if my machine quilting needle keeps breaking?

If you find that your machine quilting needle keeps breaking, then it's likely that you are using the wrong size or type of needle.

Make sure to check the size and type of needle recommended for your fabric weight and thickness before stitching.

Conclusion:

Learning about the complexities of needle sizes for machine quilting and how to choose the perfect size for your quilting project is essential.

Keep in mind that different types of threads and fabrics need different needle sizes.

Further, you can make the task easier by properly threading the needle into your machine.

Ultimately, with a good selection of brands available in the market these days, you can get needles suited to all your quilting needs.

All that’s left now is to experiment with different sizes until you find one that suits your type of fabric and thread best – then quilting demons be gone!

Finally, take the plunge and start exploring the wonders of machine quilting – why don’t you give it a go today?

Have fun trying out different brands and sizes until you find what works best for you!

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